in veritate lux vitae

Bible Studies and Articles

Three Key Texts on What Christians Say About Death

St. Paul says that we do not grieve “as others do who have no hope” (1 Thessalonians 4:13). Our Lord lives. Death and grave, our old enemies that used to devour everything, have been put under his feet (1 Corinthians 15:25). The nature of our hope and what we can say about our Christian friends and family who have died in the faith is the subject of this brief article. There are three passages that I want you to know and with which I want you to become familiar. Knowing them will help you think and speak about death as a Christian. You won’t have to utter the same empty platitudes about “going to a better place.” You’ll be able to speak an articulate hope founded on the Scriptures and made real by Jesus’ victory over the grave.

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Immanuel Lutheran
Geography of Worship, Parts 1-3

The Lutherans make a key distinction to help us understand the difference between legalistic worship and God’s gospel worship; sacramental and sacrificial. The gracious actions from God to men are “sacramental.” The thanksgiving and praise that come as result of having been blessed are “sacrifice.” We give these praises to God. That is to say, the only sacrifices we make in the divine service are in response to God’s works and blessings. We never sacrifice to earn anything. That is called “propitiatory sacrifice.” There is only one such sacrifice that has been made that God found wholly pleasing and acceptable payment for grace, his Son’s blood. God offers up his Son to obtain his kindness for sinful men.

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Immanuel Lutheran
How Should I Prepare to Receive Holy Communion?

“These questions and answers are no child's play, but are drawn up with great earnestness of purpose by the venerable and pious Dr. Luther for both young and old. Let each one take heed and likewise consider it a serious matter; for St. Paul says, to the Galatians, chapter sixth: "Be not deceived; God is not mocked.”

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Immanuel Lutheran